Polar Bear Facts for Kids

We have some polar bear facts for kids and some other useful links, including quizzes, how to draw a polar bear by a great father and son team, some polar bear jokes and some wonderful pictures.

Where do Polar Bears live?

Polar bears are incredible creatures that live in the Arctic region. They can be found in Canada, Greenland, Russia and Norway. There is a large population of polar bears in Alaska.

Polar bear and cub

How big are Polar Bears

They are the largest living land carnivore. They weigh over 1000 pounds and measure 10 feet from nose to tail.

large polar bear

What do Polar Bears eat?

It spends the majority of its time attacking and eating seals and other marine life. They are also known to eat birds, walrus, fish, and whales. The polar bears’ food largely depends on where they live in the world but when on land they mainly eat land-based animals such as caribou, muskoxen, reindeer, arctic hares and squirrels.

They catch seals by hiding near holes where the seals live and waiting for one to come out. Seals swim faster than polar bears so they wouldn’t catch many bu chasing them!

It’s a bit different when they live in a zoo! Find out what polar bears eat at San Diego Zoo by clicking below:

https://animals.sandiegozoo.org/animals/polar-bear

polar bear hunting

Climate Change

Some polar bears depend on ice to survive, as they use it for resting, hunting, and swimming which is why they are susceptible to climate change.

When there is no more ice, they move onto land to search for food.

Polar bear on ice

Are Polar Bears always white?

Despite their name, polar bears are not always white – their fur can range from white to black or any other colour in between.  The skin under their fur is black!

Their thick fur contains layers of air that insulate them from the cold weather.

Polar bear fur

How do Polar Bears stay warm?

Because of the cold, polar bears have a thick layer of fat that helps them stay warm. This thick layer is also what makes them one of the heaviest mammals out there. The average weight for a male bear is over 900 pounds and about 600 pounds for females.

Are Polar Bears an endangered species?

There are approximately 25,000 to 40,000 polar bears in the world today. This number is rapidly declining due to the bear’s dependence on ice packs for hunting and their prey species moving further north where the ice is melting at a faster rate. The rapid decrease of these animals has been predicted to lead to the extinction of the species by 2050 if the global temperature continues to rise. The polar bear has been listed as one of the most endangered animal populations on our planet.

As polar ice melts due to climate change, the bears’ habitat is shrinking and they are increasingly being hunted.

Polar bears are turning up in places they’ve never been seen before. There have been sightings in areas such as the Arabian Peninsula, Southern Europe, and even Kansas City! These sightings are a recent phenomenon that has many people worried about the fate of polar bears. Global warming is changing the bear’s habitat and disrupting their food supply.

The polar bear is a symbol of the environment. This poignant animal has been an important part of the Arctic environment for centuries, but recent trends are indicating that they are struggling to survive.

Useful Websites for Children

National Geographic Kids

The National Geographic Kids website is one that is always safe to send your children to.

World Wildlife Fund

WWF – there are wonderful pictures on this website but you may want to check it if you have younger children as it also shows a carcass of something that the polar bear has caught.

https://www.wwf.org.uk/learn/fascinating-facts/polar-bears

And for education resources click here:

https://www.worldwildlife.org/teaching-resources/toolkits/polar-bear-toolkit

Harper Collins Publishers

https://www.harpercollins.com/blogs/harperkids/10-polar-bear-facts-for-kids

Polar Bear Quizzes

CBC – (Canadian TV Channel)

This is a good one to start with. It is on a Canadian website and as we know most polar bears live in Canada so the Canadians know a lot about polar bears. It is multiple choice so you get a chance to guess if you’re not sure of the answer and then you get information about the correct answer.

https://www.cbc.ca/kidscbc2/the-feed/how-much-do-you-know-about-polar-bears

WWF

Here is a super quiz for your children to try

https://www.wwf.org.uk/node/40556

If they don’t get all the answers right the first time, they can just do it again. They’re sure to beat their score.

Wicked Weather Watch

For PDF to print out with a quiz and lots more detailed information and aimed more at secondary but perhaps some older Primary School children who were fluent readers and particularly interested in polar bears would like these sheets.

(And a quiz for the adults from the Guardian)

I just thought I’d slept this one in as it’s got some interesting bits and pieces in it.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/quiz/2014/feb/27/test-knowledge-polar-bears-quiz

Polar Bear Jokes

If you like jokes here is a whole page of them about polar bears.

https://funkidsjokes.com/polar-bear-jokes/

How to draw a Polar Bear

Would your child enjoy drawing their own polar bear? Here is a great video clip created by a father and son, where the father draws the polar bear and the son follows along. Obviously, this boy has a very talented father and he does a lot of drawing, so don’t forget to encourage your child, no matter what the outcome, and remind them that they can always do another one.

The Great Fire Of London

The Great Fire Of London

The Great Fire of London is a popular topic for Key Stages 1, 2 and 3.

There are lots of resources around including whole websites dedicated to the fire, websites of museums in London who have their own collection of objects, videos, craft activities, worksheets etc.

 

Videos Of the Great Fire of London for KS1, KS2 and KS3 and beyond.

There are many videos for your children to watch on Youtube.

Here are a few I would recommend:

These ones are aimed many at KS1 but may be fun for some younger KS2 pupils as well.

 

These are more suited to Key Stage 2 and above.

These were created by Channel 5 who also do some fire investigations in the first programme with wattle and daub doors.

 

 

Facts about Great Fire of London – 1666

The Great Fire of London began on Sunday, September 2nd 1666 near Pudding Lane. at Thomas Farriner’s bakery on Pudding Lane. A baker had left some flour-dusted dough out overnight on an oven that had not been cleaned. Sparks from the oven ignited the fire which then spread quickly across the city.

This led to the destruction of most of the buildings in London including 13,200 houses, 87 parish churches, St Paul’s Cathedral and the Royal Exchange and left over six thousand people homeless.

People were forced to flee their homes with nothing but the clothes on their backs, and thousands lost everything. Many of those ended up living in tents on the outskirts of London.

The spread was rapid due to the wooden construction of the buildings and the lack of firefighting equipment available at the time.

There was no formal fire brigade, little training and very basic equipment available such as leather buckets, fire squirts, but they and local people worked hard to put out the fires caused by the Great Fire of London.

The fire burned for five days and nights before finally being put out on September 6th by blowing up houses with gunpowder.

There had also been a drought in London for more than 10 months. The city had not seen rain since November of 1665 and the only water supply available was from a single well at Moorfields. This lead to the houses burning even quicker than they might have done otherwise.

We know so much about the fire as it was documented in letters and newspapers, and artists painted pictures of what it was like.

One survivor was Samuel Pepys who wrote a famous diary. He was born in London on February 23, 1633.

Pepy’s diary records his key social and political observations, including those about the Great Fire of London in 1666

A monument was built to remember the Great Fire. This was called “The Monument” and is a column which is 202ft tall and was designed by Sir Christopher Wren and Dr Robert Hooke. It stands on the corner between Fish Street Hill and Monument Street. 202ft is the distance between it and the fire.

 

The Monument to the Fire of London

Before the Great Fire of London, the houses were all made out of wood which caused them to be easily burnt. When they rebuilt the city, they made sure that many new buildings were built in bricks and weren’t as close together.

One of the buildings that was engulfed by fire was Old St. Paul’s Cathedral. It was rebuilt in the same area but following a new design by Christopher Wren.

Five ways London changed after the fire was explained by the BBC London News team in this accessible article which also includes lots of interesting pictures.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-36774166.

It includes new building regulations, no hanging signs for pubs and better access to water. I was particularly surprised to read that previously the water pipes were wooden!

A very good overview from Channel 5 who also do some fire investigations with wattle and daub doors.

 

A bit of interactive fun for children

The Great Fire Of London

Children need to be familiar with the story in order to play this game.

If they are not, let them watch one or more of the videos at the top of the page.

 

Craft Activities

If you search on Google Images or Pinterest you’ll find plenty of examples of school displays. Just looking at these will give you all your children a few ideas.

I also particularly like shoebox craft activities that many people do. There is a particularly good example on the Lottie Makes blog, see the third pin on my Pinterest board – https://www.pinterest.co.uk/jpin6213/great-fire-of-london/. I will also put a link to the blog below.

Fire of London Pinterest Board
My Board on Pinterest about the Great Fire of London

Shoe box idea

Great Fire of London – Story in a Shoe Box

The Great Fire of London for Kids – KS1 Scrapbook Crafts

Making-a-great-fire-of-London-house

 

Some useful websites

The National Archives

https://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/education/resources/fire-of-london/

This site is particularly useful if you would like to do some work using primary sources.

They are presented in a way that is very accessible and with suggestions for investigating using his resources.

Museum of London

The Museum of London also makes good use of primary resources. In this case, they have used items from their own collection

https://www.museumoflondon.org.uk/discover/great-fire-london-1666

You can scroll through photographs and read about the individual items. This would be more appropriate for adults or older children.

The London Fire Brigade website

https://www.london-fire.gov.uk/museum/history-and-stories/the-great-fire-of-london/

Here, among other things, they estimate the total cost of the fire was about 10 million pounds at the time when London’s annual income was about £12,000 a year. I found myself wondering about how this compares to the cost of the pandemic that we are presently going through.

Historic UK

https://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryMagazine/DestinationsUK/Survivors-of-the-Great-Fire-of-London/

Historic UK does have its own page about Great Fire of London which is more general but I like this one because it shows you some of the most interesting buildings that survived the great fire.

 

Visit London

If you are lucky enough to live near or visit visit you may want to try one of these walks.

Great Fire Of London Walk With Kids

A Great Fire of London walk with kids – visit Great Fire of London locations

Free walking tour London to learn facts about the Great Fire of London

https://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/things-to-do/walks-and-itineraries/self-guided-walks-and-trails/the-great-fire-of-london

https://www.museumoflondon.org.uk/museum-london-docklands/event-detail?id=73409

https://www.london-walking-tours.co.uk/great-fire-of-london-walk.htm

Make a shoebox

Here is a great idea for a craft activity done in a shoebox from the website Lottie Makes.

Some more useful videos

We have some daft dancing in a garden in between verses and there’s not a lot of information but children might like it and you can talk through the pictures that appear.

Now this is a throwback to my early days of teaching and I do remember this episode – actually I just remembered the buring of the cheese!! I and my kids used to love Magic Grandad! You might find it a bit dated?

 

For even more resources check out my Great Fire of London Board on Pinterest

European Countries and Capitals Wordsearch

European Countries and Capitals Wordsearch

You choose the level of difficulty when doing this European countries and capitals wordsearch.  You get different words every time.

Click here to see a full list of European Countries and Capitals

 

How To Play
  • Choose the size of the grid that you want to play.  The larger the grid the longer the words are that can be included and more words are likely to be included.
  • Look for the words. All the words can be read left to right and top to bottom.
  • Click or touch the first letter of the word and the last letter of the word.
  • The words will then be highlighted in different colours.
  • Find all the words and you will win the game.
BTW - if you have words in the grid that you were not expecting - click on the page title to refresh.  If you just have https://tutor-your-child.com showing then the words will be drawn from all of the wordsearches on the website.
Select Level:
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European Countries and Capital wordsearch example
European Countries and Capital wordsearch example

 

 

 

 

 

 

European countries and capitals wordsearch example with answers
European countries and capitals wordsearch example with answers

King Henry VIII’s Wives – free resources

King Henry VIII’s Wives – free resources

Here I have listed some of the free resources that are available when you are researching King Henry VIII’s Wives.

His 6 wives were Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves, Kathryn Howard and Katherine Parr.

Catherine of Aragon

There is a rhyme to help us remember how their marriages ended –

“Divorced, beheaded, died; divorced, beheaded, survived”.

An Introduction to Henry’s Wives

This is suitable for Primary school children and beyond as an introduction

http://primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk/tudors/kings/wives.html

as is this –

https://www.natgeokids.com/uk/discover/history/monarchy/wives-of-henry-viii/

A Crossword and a Word Search from Primary Resources

– with answers

http://www.primaryresources.co.uk/history/pdfs/Henry VIII_xwd.

pdf

PowerPoints from Primary resources

https://www.primaryresources.co.uk/history/history3.htm – there are a few here

Another introduction to the wives

– aimed at secondary but accessible for older primary

https://www.historyonthenet.com/the-tudors-the-six-wives-of-henry-viii

Horrible Histories song about the wives

– with a transcript on this page

https://multimedia-english.com/videos/esl/henry-viii-song-horrible-histories-1764

Another amusing song to help you remember the wives

– perhaps check this out before sharing with children.

Personally I love it!

It is sung to the tune of Money, Money, Money by ABBA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3EGzHsye71c&feature=youtu.be

More about the six wives

– small pictures with links to much more information

https://tudorhistory.org/wives/

All on one page –

https://www.historyhit.com/the-6-wives-of-henry-viii-in-order/

Nice clear pictures on this one –

https://allthatsinteresting.com/henry-viiis-wives

Information for teachers/parents – with a word search and a matching activity

– aimed at teachers for KS2 children

http://www.englishcenter.dk/Files/Billeder/PDF/pdfoxford/Oxford Bookworms/newobwhenrysixwiveswork.pdf

Here is a word search of the six wives – you will know their names by now.

Choose the 20 by 20 grid. (Well you can choose any size but the bigger one I more likely to get all of the six wives in.)

The names are all written left to right or going downwards.

How To Play
  • Choose the size of the grid that you want to play.  The larger the grid the longer the words are that can be included and more words are likely to be included.
  • Look for the words. All the words can be read left to right and top to bottom.
  • Click or touch the first letter of the word and the last letter of the word.
  • The words will then be highlighted in different colours.
  • Find all the words and you will win the game.
BTW - if you have words in the grid that you were not expecting - click on the page title to refresh.  If you just have https://tutor-your-child.com showing then the words will be drawn from all of the wordsearches on the website.
Select Level:
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I look forward to hearing from you if these resources useful or you have others to suggest.

Please leave comments below.  I do read them all.

Easter Story Powerpoint KS2

Easter Story Powerpoint KS2

There are a few Easter story powerpoints on the web but they are not as easy to find as you might expect so I have collected my favourite ones here. I have shown you one of two slides from each so that youcan get a feel for what it might look like before downloading it.

https://www.sermons4kids.com/easter_2.pptA picture of Jesus at the last supper

 

The Easter Story for IWB

https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/the-easter-story-for-iwb-3005381#

Created by Bev Evans and available for free at the TES site.  You do have to register to get access but it is free.

You can also see it at http://www.communication4all.co.uk/PowerPoint Presentations/easter.pps

Why is the Easter Story important for Christians

http://www.learnanywhere.co.uk/la/re/4c.ppt 

Here are a couple of screenshots from this powerpoint

Here are some symbols of the last supper

Questions about how Jesus felt as he was being betrayed

The Easter Story

This isn’t a powerpoint but it follows a similar format.

https://www.topmarks.co.uk/Easter/EasterStory.aspx

The title page of the Easter story with Jesus carrying the cross

How we celebrate Easter in the UKThis shows a couple of Easter cards

This Easter powerpoint includes some of the other elements of celebrating Easter in this country – with information about the Queen’s Maundy Money, and the Easter bunny among others!

Holy Week Powerpoint

This one has a lot more details about each day in the week running up to EasterHere we see Jesus kneeling and hear of his anger at the corrupt money changers.

 

An Easter Story Drag and Drop Game

https://request.org.uk/restart/2017/02/03/easter-story-drag-and-drop-game/

Easter Story drag and drop game

Here is an Easter chatterbox (aka fortune tellers)

https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/easter-story-chatterbox-1-6037979

There are eight questions to be asked and answered and children love using these.

Of course you could make your own.

A useful document with 20 classroom ideas for celebrating Easter with KS2

http://www.dioceseofcoventry.org/images/document_library/UDR01699.pdf

 

Planet Earth Facts

Planet Earth Facts

This article has been inspired by a book called The Big Countdown: Seven Quintillion, Five hundred Quadrillion Grains of Sand on Planet Earth. Its author is Paul Rockett. It is full of pictures, infographics and amazing planet Earth facts. It was published in 2014 so I imagine that most of the facts are still correct.

The book

Planet Surface

70.8% of the earth’s surface is water.

29.2% of the earth’s surface is land.

The Earth’s Atmosphere

This book takes great delight in using enormous numbers. It tells us about the Earth’s atmosphere is that it is made up of atoms as is everything around us.  Apparently, some scientists think that there are about 200 tredecillion atoms in the atmosphere. One tredecillion has 42 zeros in it!

We learn about the 5 layers of the Earth’s atmosphere.  They are the troposphere, the stratosphere, the mesosphere, thermosphere and exosphere. The outer layer of the exosphere is 8000 kilometres away, well not exactly because there isn’t a specific edge. It just drifts off into outer space.

One of the facts I found interesting, is that an estimated 40 tonnes of meteors crash into the middle layer every single day.  Luckily for us, they burnt out before getting any closer to the Earth.

7 Quintillion, 500 Quadrillion Grains Of Sand On The Planet Earth

7 Quintillion, 500 Quadrillion Grains Of Sand On The Planet Earth is part of the title of the book and is also a chapter title.

This is obviously an estimate.  There is no way anyone could count all the grains of sand on the Earth.  Sand comes in different sizes anything from 0.06 of a millimetre to 2 mm. To come up with the number 7 quintillion 500 quadrillion,  scientist calculated how many grains of sand would fit into a teaspoon and then they multiplied the number of teaspoons they thought they were in all the beaches in the world and all the deserts in the world. How accurate do you think they might have been?

There are some amazingly long beaches in the world,  according to this book the longest one in the world is Praia do Cassino beach in Brazil which is just over 250 km long. The next couple of longest beaches are Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh which is just over 240 km long and Padre Island Texas where the beach is about 230 km long. After that come to beaches which are both called Ninety Mile Beach one of them is in New Zealand and one of them is in Australia.  The one that is in Australia is actually slightly longer and the one that is in New Zealand is actually about 88 miles long not 90 as its name suggests.

The largest sun sand castle in the world was built in America and was nearly as tall as 3 double decker buses.

Deserts make up about 9.5% of the world surface, however, only about 20% of the deserts in the world are covered by sand. The others are covered with rocks and pebbles and different types of soils.

People

We now have over 7 billion people living on the Earth. This is twice as many as they were 50 years ago. In the next 50 years it is estimated that we will have over 9 billion people living on the Earth. Nearly 90 babies are born every 20 seconds.

The Earth’s population is spread over 7 continents – Asia, Africa, North  America, South America, Europe, Australasia and Antarctica.

Asia has the largest land mass and also the largest population with over 4 billion people living there, most of those in China.

Australasia has the fewest people living there.  Nobody lives there permanently but about 4000 scientists come To live and work there each year.

Water

As we’ve said most of the Earth is covered with water,  70.8% of its surface in fact. 68.3% of the earth’s surface is covered with saltwater and 2.5% of the earth’s surface is covered with freshwater. However, about 41% of the known species of fish are only found in freshwater.

The largest fish that is found in salt water is the whale shark which can grow up to 12 metres in length and its mouth is 1 and 1/2 metres wide!

The largest freshwater fish is the Beluga sturgeon this can live in both freshwater and saltwater and it can measure up to 5 metres long.

Sea sponges are a type of animal life, scientists reckon that they have probably been around for over 760 trillion years.

Most of us will have heard of the longest rivers in the world the very longest is the river Nile in Africa which is about 6,650 km long after that is the Amazon in South America, the Yangtze in Asia and the Mississippi in North America.

The largest waterfalls in the world are the Angel Falls in Venezuela Which has a height of 979 m, and then Tugela in South Africa and then or Utigord in Norway.

Volcanoes

Children often enjoy learning about volcanoes at school.  There are three types of volcanoes – Composite volcanoes, Cinder Cone volcanoes, and Shield volcanoes.

Volcanoes can also be classified as active dormant or extinct.

Active means it’s erupted in the last 10000 years.  Dormant volcanoes, are those which have not erupted but they might erupt again, and Extinct volcanoes are those which are not expected to ever erupt again.

Inside a volcano - diagram

For more information

For more details on these and many other subjects you might like to get a copy of the book – it is available for 35% off (at the time of writing) and free P&P to anywhere in the world from Book Depository

Contents page