Is it Grammatically Correct To Have Two Adverbs in a Row in a Sentence?

Many people believe that it is incorrect to have two adverbs in a row, but this is not always the case. While it is true that two adverbs can sometimes create a clunky sentence, there are times when two adverbs are needed to convey the desired meaning. When used correctly, two adverbs in a row can add emphasis and help to create a more interesting sentence.

Define adverbs

An adverb is a word that describes a verb (an action or a doing word). Adverbs often tell us how, when, where, or why someone does something. For example:

He ran quickly.

She slept soundly.

They arrived late.

Adverbs can be formed in different ways:

Most adverbs are created by adding -ly to an adjective, as seen in the examples above. 

You can also create an adverb by using words like very, quite, enough, too, and really. 

For example:

He ran very quickly. 

She slept quite soundly. 

They arrived too late.

Two Adverbs in a Row: Examples and Explanations

When it comes to verbs, there are a few important things to keep in mind. For one, they’re essential to creating effective sentences. And two, using two adverbs in a row is perfectly fine – as long as you do it correctly.

Adverbs are words that modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. They usually come after the verb they’re modifying and can provide additional information about how an action is being carried out. For example, in the sentence “He slowly walked across the room,” the adverb “slowly” modifies the verb “walked” to show us how he did it.

When you use two adverbs in a row, be careful not to create a sentence that sounds awkward or unnatural.

When is it Appropriate to use Two Adverbs in a row?

Using two adverbs in a row is appropriate when you want to emphasize the degree of the action. For example, if you wanted to say that someone ran quickly, using the adverbs “very” and “fast” would be appropriate. This would be seen as more emphatic than just using the word “quickly.”

Sometimes you may wish to include two adverbs in a sentence, albeit not in a row.

If you want to emphasize a particular action or adjective, using two adverbs can be effective. For example, “She slowly but surely advanced on her prey.” In this sentence, the two adverbs help to create a sense of tension and foreboding.

Another time when using two adverbs may be appropriate is when you are trying to create a specific mood or tone. For example, “He sadly yet resignedly walked away from his old life.” In this sentence, the double adverb emphasizes the character’s feelings of sadness and resignation.

However, there are some instances where using two adverbs in a row might not make sense. If you’re describing an action that doesn’t have a lot of room for interpretation – such as “He died instantly,” – then adding another adverb might not be necessary. In general, if you’re unsure whether or not to use two adverbs, err on the side of caution and just use one.

Conclusion

In conclusion, it is grammatically correct to have two adverbs in a row in a sentence. However, it is important to use them sparingly and to make sure that they are both necessary and add something to the sentence. Overusing adverbs can make your writing sound cluttered and can ultimately turn readers off.

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KS2 Adverbs Wordsearch

KS2 Adverbs Wordsearch

Here we have a KS2 adverbs wordsearch.

Children could use this for fun and then use some of the words they find here in their writing.

[Tweet “Each time the page is refreshed or a new size of grid is chosen, the wordsearch will be recreated from a bank of adverbs.”]

 

[game-wordsearch id=”410″ ]

 

Also, see the link below for more about adverbs, including examples, lists, powerpoints and videos.

Adverbs KS2 – Describing a verb

 

Adverb KS2 meaning
Adverb KS2 meaning

Adverbs KS2 – Describing a verb

 

What is an adverb?

Why Adverbs KS2?

It is important to learn about adverbs in KS2 but there will be more complex explanations and examples in KS3 and beyond.

An adverb is a word that describes a verb, at least that’s what I remember learning at school. It’s a  little bit more complicated than that.

An adverb can also describe an adjective or another adverb.

However, let’s not overcomplicate it when teaching, unless your child is ready for the next stage.

Here’s a song for your child

 

 

Some examples of adverbs that describe a verb.

The adverb is not always next to the verb. It often describes how something was done.

I have underlined the adverb.

Cautiously, the Fox looked around the farm.

The sailor courageously climbed the mast.

The teacher cheerfully took the children out to play.

The boy played football enthusiastically.

The girl looked around the garden inquisitively.

The postman nervously walked around the dog.

The vet gently put a bandage on the cat.

The market trader shouted loudly to the crowd to come and look at all his goods.

These next sentences include the adverb that answers the question “when?”

Before we went for our dinner, we washed our hands.

We often went shopping.

We must get to school punctually.

Tomorrow we will go swimming.

I am hoping to get a bicycle soon.

I need to clean my bedroom now.

I have to hoover again.

These sentences include the adverb that answers the question “how often?”

The clock chimes hourly.

Occasionally we go to the seaside.

I tell her repeatedly not to break my toys.

We pay our car insurance annually.

Usually, the cat likes to be stroked.

I am constantly cleaning up.

I never get to play with the Lego.

These sentences include the adverb that answers the question “where?”

The kitchen is downstairs.

Look up to see the sky.

Can you feel the sand below your feet?

I left my gloves here.

Let’s go outside and play.

These sentences include the adverb that answers the question “how much?”

He is completely mad.

You ate almost all the biscuits.

I think that dress is rather nice.

We got very wet.

There are two adverbs in these sentences.

The criminal solemnly swore that he would never steal again.

The police often had to drive quickly to catch criminals who were escaping.

Eventually, the boy carefully hung up all his shirts.


Games to play with adverbs

Here is a miming game to play – it is free on the TES site if you join.

https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/verbs-and-adverbs-game-6397827

You can devise your own if you have a list of verbs and a list of adverbs.

Try the quiz on this BBC Bitesize page

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zwwp8mn/articles/zgsgxfr

Check out this Adverbs wordsearch


Some adverb lists for KS2

http://www.keystage2literacy.co.uk/adverbs.html

These ones you have to download

https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/171-adverbs-learning-mat-6420991

https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/adverb-word-bank-6147848

http://www.primaryresources.co.uk/english/englishB2.htm#adverbs

And these worksheets are from America and so use American spelling rather than British spelling so be careful with them if you are in the UK.

http://www.momswhothink.com/reading/list-of-adverbs.html

https://www.superteacherworksheets.com/adverbs.html

http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/parts-of-speech/adverbs/list-of-100-adverbs.html


Worksheets for Adverbs

I am including some links here for worksheets to do with adverbs however I never really advocate just using worksheets as they are written.  Sometimes it is helpful for you to see the sort of activity of child might do but I would try and think of a way to cut it up and make a game of it.  At the very least is it possible to make a quiz out of it maybe even with some prizes? Put individual words on cards cut them out and then reorder them.

I am not sure why the first piece is called “nice” homework.

https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/adverbs-worksheet-nice-homework-6119653

https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/adverbs-worksheet-6452064


Interactive stories where you can choose some adverbs

Finish the story – Bushfire

http://www.scootle.edu.au/ec/viewing/L1275/index.html#

Make sure your speakers are turned on!

Adverbs KS2

Super Stories – The Sea Cave

http://www.scootle.edu.au/ec/viewing/L6187/index.html

Or try using one of these storybook creators:

https://www.mystorybook.com/

https://www.storyjumper.com/

https://www.storybird.com/

all of which give you a lot more freedom and lots of actions to describe.

Adverbs KS2

Adverbs Powerpoint KS2

Here are some useful powerpoints –  they are all free.

https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/adverbs-11109763

https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/spag-adventurous-adverbs-activity-6340899

There are plenty more here and these tell you what year group they are suitable for – http://www.primaryresources.co.uk/english/englishB2.htm 


Videos

There are masses of videos on YouTube here are just a few that you might like to check out.

But the adverbs describing adjectives here are not ones you would want to use too much of.

I like this video – there is more detail.  However, you might want to start with the first one and move on to this one.

Let me know what you think in the comments below.

What have I missed out?